Am I the only person who hides things from herself? With the best of intentions, mind you. I did it again last week. Before company arrived, I dashed around picking up and straightening. In my hurry, I stuffed a mish-mash of business cards, pens, and do-dads into a plastic bag, and stowed them out of sight. And apparently out of mind.

A few days later, I checked every nook and cranny looking for the bag. On the bottom shelves of the dining room cupboards I scrutinized my collection of pink Depression glass that I rarely use.

I should add: An expert has never examined and verified that my glassware is genuine Depression glass. But I don’t care because I like it.

I can’t recall when my desire to amass pink glass started. I look blah in pink, but I like the color. Was that my impetus to buy it? My mother-in-law and sister fueled the flames by adding to my collection on my birthdays.

My stash of pink Depression Glass.

My stash of pink Depression Glass.

Are they antiques? No. Antiques should be over 100 years old, and of value or historical significance. I doubt my pink pretties are any of those. Items 50-years-old lapse into the realm of Collectibles. The time period 1950-1959 is generally referred to as Retro. Vintage, originally used to define bottled wine, now describes objects that recycled back into fashion: 1960-1979.

This Vintage Jeepster Commando is someone’s baby.

This Vintage Jeepster Commando is someone’s baby.

I was sad when one of my favorite shops, Funtiques, closed. I’d found many treasures there.

I think about Amish women poking around tag/garage sales and wonder what they might purchase. Nothing too fancy? You might be surprise to learn that fine China is a traditional wedding gift from many an Amish groom to his bride. As is stemware. Once married, the China is usually stored out of sight, and saved for special occasions.

The China may have a pink, fancy design if the bride so wishes. Amish Author Linda Byler describes this tradition nicely in her novel The Witnesses. (Linda Byler is actually Amish.)

Do you collect items you rarely use, but simply like? For instance, Pyrex? (Now that I think about it, I wish I hadn’t given away mine. Or are they hiding in the basement?) Teaspoons? Amish-made mementoes?

Could you have fun in “Doilies 2 Doorknobs, plus 25 Vendors” in Stanwood, WA?

Could you have fun in “Doilies 2 Doorknobs, plus 25 Vendors” in Stanwood, WA?

Back to my pink Depression glass. When I took the photo I noticed I had two little duplicate creamers. In my never-ending quest to downsize, I decided to offer one as a prize, along with this lovely Amish-made potholder from Lancaster County, PA. Plus a signed copy of one novel from the Legacy of Lancaster Trilogy! Leave a comment to enter the Giveaway. USA & Canada. Winner has 3 days to respond.

Amish-made Potholder & Depression glass creamer (not sure of its age)

Amish-made Potholder & Depression glass creamer (not sure of its age)

 

Trilogy